Dandelion and top 5 reasons not to kill them

People spend a lot of wasted money & time getting rid of these beautiful “weeds”.

Picture of a dandelion with a bee sitting on top of it

My earliest memories of Dandelions were of course when they went to seed and you could blow on them, then the little white ball would float in the air for a moment and scatter in the wind, This white puff contains the seeds.

Dandelion’s blowing in the wind

5 Benefits of Dandelion

#1. Dandelions have anti-inflammatory properties, Therefore helping to relieve pain. Can be very beneficial to those suffering from arthritis. Inflammation can lead to many serious diseases, so reducing inflammation should be high on our priority list.

#2 Dandelions have a high source of vitamins, A, C, K & E making dandelions beneficial topically and orally, Including minerals, Iron, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. This makes dandelions useful in many applications, including a great addition to any salad. Pop the flowers off the stem and rinse very well. Keep in mind you don’t want to use from areas that have been sprayed with chemicals.

#3. Dandelions help rid your liver of toxins just wash the little yellow flower and eat 1 or two a day. Research has been done on mice & the results were amazing. Mice that had been given high doses of toxins, had bounced back due to dandelions. Remember only to use chemical-free flowers. Dandelion tea is another great way to benefit. ( recipe below)

#4. Dandelions have been used medically to treat high triglycerides, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. There are natural compounds you can take in pill form or salve’s you can use topically.

I started picking dandelions and making oil infusions from all parts of the plant, concentrating on the flower & roots. ( how to listed below)

#5. Dandelions contain potent antioxidants. Antioxidants are molecules that help prevent free radicals. Too many free radicals speed up aging. Dandelions also are rich in beta-carotene that works well to prevent signs of aging. Using a blend of dandelion and coconut oil is a great way to moisturize your skin while adding natural benefits.

Young dandelion

This is a picture of a young dandelion, you can tell by the leaves, they are small and few, as the years go by the leaves get larger and the rosette gets fuller.

“Enjoy what I think is a blessing, not a menace.”

How to make your infusion of dandelion and oil. I thoroughly wash the dandelion from flower to root, then I lay it on paper towels to dry. Make sure they are dried well because moisture can ruin your infusion. Next, I put them into a mason jar and add my choice of oils. (Many to choose from). My top 2 choices are extra virgin olive oil that has been cold-pressed, and or coconut oil, (unrefined). Always opt for non-GMO’s. Next, your method can be 1 of 3, depending on your needs. If you need quicker results, the heated method is the quickest.

Use a double boiler or crock pot ( set on low for the first hour, then warm) lowest possible setting. Do not bring to boil, let sit on low heat for 1-2 hours, Remove from heat, stir well breaking up stems and roots adding back to low heat for another 1-2 hours, after removing from the heat source, strain off the plant, leaving just the oil, add 2% vitamin E, this helps to extend shelf life, which runs 1year, approximately. Be sure to smell and observe before using.

The second choice is just by filling a jar with plant then oil. ( Leave 1/2′ gap) put jars in a cool dark place, shaking every day for approximately 6 weeks. Then drain off the plant and add vitamin E.

The third choice is called a tincture. Same as the first two options, add to jar covering in alcohol instead of oil (vodka, or Gin) let sit for 6 weeks or more, shake every day, if possible.

Now you have your very own dandelion oil. You can make many things, use as-is for massage oil or add an ingredient or two for skin softening, you can also add herbs according to need. Good-Luck and have fun. Let us know how it turned out or feel free to ask questions.

Dandelion Tea

I take the steams after they have been washed then dried and chopped them into small pieces, then I roast them by oven or frying pan. Once that has been done I throw in some of the leaves that had been washed and dried. Approximately 2 parts stem to 1 part leaves, Then add boiling water to the combination, let seep a couple of mins then strain. You will have to play with the ratio. Enjoy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.